Bahadır Çapar

Single Sea Kayak

singleyak-red.png

Length with skeg: 5.030 mm
Length with rudder: 5.170 mm
Beam: 585 mm
Weight: 21 kg (Carbon Kevlar)
Storage Volume: front 60 litre, rear 95 litre, day 20 litre

Pittarak Single

Yellow deck white hull. rudder, 25kg, must sell going OS. $2.250

ono inc carbon/kevlar paddle, trolley, spray deck, dry bags, PFD, tow line.

contact: 04 1726 0050

e-mail: stephan.delisle(at)executiveadvisors.com.au

Pittarak Single Classic (27 kg)

singleyak-red.png

Length with skeg: 5.030 mm
Length with rudder: 5.170 mm
Beam: 585 mm
Weight: 21 kg (Carbon Kevlar)
Storage Volume: front 60 litre, rear 95 litre, day 20 litre

Pittarak Single Classic
Ex-Demo Single Classic with retractable Skeg, towing point, pale grey Deck, white hull, (27Kg)
$2.900
e-mail: explore(at)pittarak.com.au

Pittarak Single Classic (22 Kg)

singleyak-red.png

Length with skeg: 5.030 mm
Length with rudder: 5.170 mm
Beam: 585 mm
Weight: 21 kg (Carbon Kevlar)
Storage Volume: front 60 litre, rear 95 litre, day 20 litre

Yellow deck white hull. rudder, 25kg, must sell going OS. $2.250
ono inc carbon/kevlar paddle, trolley, spray deck, dry bags, PFD, tow line.
contact: 04 1726 0050
e-mail: stephan.delisle(at)executiveadvisors.com.au

South-West Tasmania

 

 

Strahan to Hobart (Nearly anyway).

By Lawrence Geoghegan with comments by the other two on the trip.



In January (2003) this year Andrew Mcauley, Paul Loker and my self paddled our kayaks from Strahan on the West Coast of Tasmania and were trying to reach our destination of Hobart in the south.

Myself in my Pittarak, Andrew in his Nadgee and Paul in his Mirage.

The trip started as an idea of mine. I lived as a child in Zeehan on the West Coast of Tassie and Geeveston in the South. I thought the idea of paddling around the outside to link the two was a great idea for a trip. I put feelers out on the NSW sea kayak club’s chat line and in the magazine, I had asked for people who had the skill and fortitude to take a trip like this on. Continue reading

Pittaraks in South Georgia

 

 

Pittaraks in South Georgia

By Wade Fairley


ice-camp-antarctica.jpg
The barometer was plummeting and the heavy sea mist had rolled up out of the south west quickly blotting out the sun and casting the world in a uniform steel gray light . Huge southern rollers swept up in relentless rows out of the south west. Here at 56 degrees south, the southern ocean literally belts around the bottom of the globe and aside from a few tiny sub Antarctic islands like South Georgia, there is no land mass to block the path of these massive waves. The huge southern ocean bommers gather momentum and power then explode with terrible force against South Georgia’s rocky cold shores.

We steered our Pittaraks through a thin channel between the cliffs of a small rocky island and the mainland. A huge grounded ice berg partially blocked the narrow lead. To go around the island would add a couple more kilometres of paddling, so we opted to try and sneak by the grounded ice tower. The heaving swell burst against the glistening ice blue slick walls. Angus had the lead, the fastest of the three of us . We each paddled five-metre single kayaks, Angus and I in Pittaraks. These were boats that two years before we had taken to the Antarctic peninsula. And kayaks we knew we could thoroughly rely upon for serious expedition paddling like South Georgia. Continue reading

A Sea Kayaking Crossing of Torres…

 

 

A Sea Kayaking Crossing of Torres Strait

By Jonathan Papalia


Abstract
The article contains an account of how four sea-kayakers crossed the tropical waterway between Cape York, Australia and New Guinea called Torres Strait. The article chronicles a twelve day, two hundred kilometre trip of open ocean sea kayaking though the beautiful and remote islands. Specific mention is made of the detailed preparations and logistics, as well as how the challenges posed by the environment were overcome. It is hoped that the article will help other adventurers planning a sea-kayak expedition.


Introduction
It all started one New Year’s Eve in Swan Hill after Judd, Anthony and I had just completed the arduous Murray Marathon (an annual, five day, 400 kilometres flat water kayak race). After 400 kilometres of paddling in the muddy brown creek that is the Murray River, we thought there must be something better to paddle on. Why not try to paddle across to New Guinea from Australia; it could not be more than a couple hundred kilometres?
In the months that followed a team called “The Orbitors” was formed comprising of Judd Boeker, Christian Gallagher, Anthony Buykx and myself. Judd and Christian have been best mates since primary school and Anthony and I are first cousins. All of us have a great passion for the natural environment and endurance sports. Firstly, we looked around for a suitable sea kayak. Anthony already owned a Pittarak sea kayak and encouraged us to get in touch with Bruce Richards and Larry Gray at Pittarak International. Anthony and I first meeting with Bruce Richards was for a leisurely one hour test paddle but we all got on so well it lasted for over five hours and included dinner. Soon three more single Pittarak sea kayaks with carbon-kelvar hulls were ordered and our trip was starting to have some reality.

Continue reading

Paddle to Nowhere: Out to Sea

 

 

PADDLE TO NOWHERE: Out to Sea

By Richard Birdsey


“Not many people come on my trips”, The Leader observed dryly as our small group kitted up on the beach. I shuffled my feet in the Bundeena sand, a little nervous. ‘What exactly does that mean?’ a small, slightly shrill voice in my head said. Do others in the club know something I don’t? Or do people go out with The Leader and not return! Bob and Kevin laughed lightly at the comment as they adorned themselves with the gaudy accoutrements of the sea-kayaker. Partially assured by their mirth I continued to load my boat, contemplating what may lie ahead.
I arrived at Bundeena at 9.50 on Sunday morning. Not a bad sort of a day. A few clouds around, a bit of wind from the east. Peering through the trees I could see three kayaks laying on the sand like beached seals. Three multi-coloured figures moved about them, packing dry-bags, paddle jackets and other paraphernalia into the boats’ cavities. Pulling gear out of my car a cheerful hello greeted me from behind. Kevin Melville introduced himself and we lugged my Pittarak across the small concrete bridge connecting the beach with Bundeena Drive. I introduced my self to Bob Head and The Leader (aka Stuart Trueman) when the latter promptly asked if he could borrow my PFD for a photo he wanted for a web page he is constructing. Apparently a yellow PFD affords the wearer greater kudos in paddling circles and makes a better photo as opposed to inferior trendy coloured Type III jackets. Off Stuart went in his boat, yellow PFD shining in the sun and subjecting the cameraman (Kevin) to a barrage of instructions on camera angles, framing and cropping. Any supermodel in earshot would have glowed with pride. Continue reading

Freycinet Peninsula – Tasmania

 

 

Freycinet Peninsula April 2004

Richard Harbury, John “Big Red” Worth


We set off in Johns’ car, he had both kinds of music, Country and Western. Luckily I was aware of this likelihood and brought my own. The map provided to find the Ferry Terminal in Sydney was completely wrong so we drove around a bit, saying “We want to be over there I think.” Stumbled into the terminal eventually, many of the Targa Tasmania cars waiting to go over also. Lots of posturing and preening evident, and from the rally competitors as well.

Set off a bit late, but as we were sitting on the back deck in 30 degree heat sucking back Cascade we accepted this with alacrity. We discovered that our ship, “Spirit of Tasmania III”, was actually bought second hand from Greece, apparently no longer being sufficiently seaworthy to bimble around the Greek Islands. This was of no concern to us who had more pressing matters to attend to, namely getting another round and ogling the (female) purser.

The First Officer addressed us over the tannoy to tell us a mild crossing with 4 metre swell was predicted. After a pleasant dinner and 10 or so beers we retired to our bunks.

Continue reading

Diving Into The Deep End…

 

Diving Into The Deep End…
Why it’s important
to get straight into the sea

Written by Larry Gray


I find that people who learn in the ocean from the start make great sea kayakers. Generally kayakers who learn in harbours or lakes develop fears of the sea that can take a while to get over. When finally the barriers are broken only then do they realise what they have been missing out on.

When I teach beginners, I like to analyse their immediate confidence—find out whether they are water people, how quickly they are going to advance, levels of fitness, how suited they are to the kayak they’ve chosen (eg does it fit them or do they fit it?). I then advise them on how to trim out their yak. After one day my trainees are close to rolling, if not doing it already.

People approach me again , usually within two weeks, with their kayak decked out to fit them comfortably. I immediately introduce them to re-entering a capsized kayak and some Continue reading

Where’s Larry? part.3

 

Where’s Larry?
part.3

Story by Richard Gulliatt


“We would go camping in these beautiful remote wilderness spots,” she says, “and Larry would go diving for mussels and come back and cook them on the fire. We would spend the day prising oysters of rocks and then tie a rope to a bottle of champagne and trail it in the water to cool it down. We’d go kayaking, swimming with seals – a lot of things I had never done before.”“I wanted to show her the amazing world under the water with a mask and snorkel, because that would be a great starting point for going on adventures together,” recalls Gray. “But I couldn’t for the life of me get her into wearing a mask underwater. So I introduced her to the idea of having a shower with the mask on.”

Within a year, O’Malley found herself socialising with Inuit on the Greenland icecap as her new partner went kayaking through icefloes. Gray had found out that Eric Phillips, an Australian adventurer, was going to trek across Greenland with two friends and arranged to join the trip as a cameraman. Continue reading